13 August 2012

Covers

No. 1


No. 2


No. 3

"M" Cover Options by Alex Martin of powerHouse


I'm leaning towards No. 1. Which one do you like and why?


27 comments:

Jake said...

One for sure

Alice Olive said...

Number one. Very Mondrian. Somehow the black is the most dramatic and also the most simple/clean.

Pedro said...

I say number 2. If I was browsing a bookshelf, it would pop out at me, the others will blend in with their surroundings. Plus the asymmetry is attractive and interesting. Symmetry should be left to nature.

ADW said...

One looks good like this, but if I cover everything but the front cover, then I prefer two or three.

Anonymous said...

Exclude No. 2 as I don't see teal as a very trad color.

Trailer Trad said...

I like the Bauhaus influence found in all three covers. -But is that trad? I leave that to your sound judgment, Tin Tin.

LouB said...

Number one. The colors work better together than the other ones, and I also see your logo in it.

rt17 said...

#1 for me. Although I'm seeing it as navy, not black. Maybe it's my monitor...?

tintin said...

I like these alot. My color choice was priimary and echos one of the earliest posts where a navy and yellow bow tie was paired with a red butcher stripe shirt. It is navy and not black. Is it Trad? Come on, Trailer Trad ... Wait'll you see the slip case.

gentleman mac said...

2; It pops out more to me than the others and I don't like how one would have to open the book and lay it flat or hold it awkwardly open to see the entire "M".

Anonymous said...

number one only looks good when it is opened up. think about the point of purchase, when the book is on the table and how it looks. number 3 is the clear winner in that respect and would look even better if it were a V rather than a M

M.Lane said...

I go with 1. Because I like it best. And because Alice likes it. And I don't think I have ever disagreed with A.O. about anything.

ML
mlanesepic.blogspot.com

Oyster Guy said...

The spine on 1 with the white interrupted by the navy looks interesting as well. That would stand out a little more on a shelf.

Anonymous said...

No. 1
If you're going for a creative crop, at least keep the wonderful weight of the font intact. Seen on the shelf it's a strong graphic. Take it in hand, turn it over, and it's an interactive treat.
TM

Anonymous said...

One.

//REW said...

I think you need the full "M" on the front cover, and the color scheme of #3 seems the most classic.

I say #3.

Anonymous said...

Number 1 for sure. Navy is a strong colour, contrasts well wit the red and yellow.

No matter what you label it, trad or whatever, it's classy.

--Matthew

ann said...

If one was completely on the front cover it would be my pick, but it's not. Visually 2 and 3 are more interesting because your eye and your mind have to work a little harder to understand the image. (Am I right that the fold is the white?) The full M is visible on 2 & 3, but subtly. The color pops in all 3 images. Especially in 3 with the red against yellow. Your eye should go there immediately. So I say 3.

TRVS said...

The "M" looks like two suits holding hands, especially no.1 ~~ just an observation.
I favor no.3--love the colors (would make a great paisley tie).
~M.

Michael Rowe said...

#1, because the others are hard to look at after awhile, for some reason. Probably the colours.

KSB said...

Three. The blue is a bit overwhelming in One and I don't care much for the colors in Two.

Will there be a way to get autographed copies?

Jeff P. said...

Numero Uno

Anonymous said...

Looking at them again, i.e. as if the images were closed like a book would be on a display table, Three is sharp. There is a lot of support for number one since aesthetically it looks better open, but when you look at it closed (imagine it closed), three might is better.

--Matthew

Julia said...

One. Symmetry.

greatzamboni said...

2- clean, modern, startling, nice....
Zambo

Makaga said...

#1, just because the M at that cropped-scale also looks like a pattern for half a mens shirt.

Anonymous said...

#1 It reminds me of the best work of Peter Saville (factory Records, etc) and Mark Farrow (Pet Shop Boys, factory records) from the 1980's. As an Anglophile and Eightiesphile (OK, I think I just coined that one) this is the highest praise I have.
Doug Philadelphia